003: Sketching scenes to tell stories

 
picnic world 1.jpg
 
 
 

Purpose

To practice sketchnoting, and help a startup founder either envision, problem solve or explain a part of their startup.


This week’s startup

Kunal Bhusare has a walkie-talkie style messaging app called Kwikly.tech.


Learning goals this week

  • Reasons why you’d want to create a story.

  • Understand what makes scenes work in telling stories.

  • Get people to take action, using emotive images using the fundamentals in the paper: “Scan Patterns When Viewing Natural Scenes: Emotion, Complexity and Repetition.”

  • Learn 3 scenarios you could use scenes to tell stories:

    • Your srengths and what makes your founder skills unique.

    • Scenes you can explain in depth:

      • The problem your customers experience.

      • How your solution is experienced by your users.

    • Scenes that are self-explanatory.

  • Practice the principles of creating scenes that:

    • Are self-explanatory.

    • Get people to take action, using emotive images .



Rules

Always sketch with a real user and their real problem in mind.



Guidelines

Speed

Silhouettes

Metaphors and similes

Observing and deconstructing basic shapes and forms.

Hand holding mobile phone



Reasons for creating a story

  1. To sell: The futurist’s inspiring vision told in detail gets buy-in.

  2. To spot what’s missing in the usability of the solution.

  3. To simplify and build understanding.

  4. To be persuasive or build an argument and consensus in a crowd.




Get people to take action

Emotive images makes people study them - long enough to be convinced.

  • Threat / benefit.

  • Unusual

  • Simplicity reduces scanning

    • Study photos before sketching a scene

  • Action buttons

11 Ben Journey-01.jpg

Simplicity reduces scanning.

So at least the foreground needs to be simple.

13 Ben Journey-01.jpg





3 scenarios

 

Your strengths and unique founder skills

  • Metaphors and similes

  • How stuff works diagrams

  • Mental model for problem solving

  • Layers of meaning

Krister+Gustafsson+Design+Thinking+Process+23+Jan+2018.jpg
 

Scenes you can explain in depth

  • The problem your customers experience.

  • How your solution is experienced by your users.

picnic world 1.jpg

But don’t do this:

No focal point or simplicity leads to eyes continually scanning.

cloud world.jpg
Magic Garden problem.jpg

One direction (drawn minimalist). You want one story.

world- urban game.jpg
 


Scenes that are self-explanatory

Ideal for a landing page.

  • Emotive

    • Threat / benefit.

  • Simple

  • Unusual

  • Action buttons

  • Study photos before sketching a scene

Interaction - bouncing on a  cloud.jpg
 

Exercise: create a scene for a landing page

Kunal Bhusare has a walkie-talkie style messaging app called Kwikly.tech.

Frustration and delight




Conclusion

  • Why sketch a story? The futurist’s inspiring vision told in detail gets buy-in.

  • Your strengths and unique skills - as a brochure with layers of meaning

  • How to create scenes you can explain in depth:

    • Your strengths and unique skills - as a brochure with layers of meaning

    • A concept showing user’s problem and solution

  • Self-explanatory scenes for landing pages:

    • Simple

    • Emotive (threat / benefit)

    • Action buttons